Canine Influenza

By | Pet Health

Sick as a dog concept - Dog in bed with scarf and water bottle on its head.

We have recently had a few questions regarding the Canine Influenza Virus and would like to help clear up any confusion.  There have been pockets of outbreaks of the virus in the US and Asia over the past several years, but we’ve been mostly spared here in Canada, until recently.  In December 2017, there were 2 confirmed cases in the Windsor-Sussex area in dogs imported from Korea.  Several other dogs that had been in contact with those affected showed signs of a mild respiratory disease, but test results are still pending. 

The influenza virus is spread via the aerosol route (cough or sneeze), through direct contact with affected dogs (licking or nuzzling), through contaminated objects (dog dishes, toys, bedding, clothing) and by people who have been handling dogs with the Influenza virus.  The virus does not survive for a long time in the environment, but is highly contagious because as a newer virus, dogs have no natural immunity against it. 

Signs of the Canine Influenza Virus can include:

  • fever
  • lethargy
  • cough
  • discharge from the eyes and or nose (either clear or mucopurulent)
  • Dehydration
  • Increased respiratory rate or effort
  • Malaise

Dogs may go on to develop pneumonia, but in mild cases, symptoms may be minimal.  Most animals recover without incident.  There currently appears to be no risk of humans contracting the virus from their dogs, but this could change if the canine and human flu viruses mix together.  Cats have a slight risk of contracting it from dogs.

Dogs of any age, breed or vaccine status are susceptible to the virus, and those who visit areas where there is known influenza activity carry the greatest risk of contracting the disease.  For dogs traveling in the United States, you can check the level of influenza activity at your destination at  Also at greater risk are dogs traveling from Asia (including rescues), and dogs who are in contact with dogs traveling from the US or Asia (at dog shows, trials, etc). 

Fortunately there is a new vaccine against the Canine Influenza Virus.  While not every dog needs the vaccine, here are situations in which it may be worth considering:

  • Dogs traveling to areas in the US or Asia where there is flu activity
  • Dogs that may have contact with dogs from Asia
  • Dogs that may have contact with dogs traveling from the US (at dog shows, dogs from kennels, etc).

Consider the vaccination also in dogs with increased risk of serious complications if the Influenza virus were to be contracted (for example dogs with heart or lung disease, senior dogs, and flat-faced dogs such as bulldogs or pugs).  Like the human Influenza vaccine, it is designed to reduce the risk of disease but does not guarantee protection.  

We should have the vaccination in stock soon.  If you are interested in the vaccine, or in learning more about the disease, please don’t hesitate to contact us.  Also, check out this blog which has very up to date information: .

Now Offering Shockwave Therapy

By | Services

Cedarview Animal Hospital is excited to announce that we now offer shockwave therapy for our patients!

What is shockwave therapy?picture of a radial shockwave device

“Radial shockwave is a pressure wave system.  The applicator head contains a small metal bullet that gets rapidly forced against the applicator head, creating a pressure wave that transmits into the tissue that the applicator head is pressed against.  The end result is a stimulus that increases blood flow to the affected area which can help stimulate healing and pain relief, and causes the release of growth factors and the recruitment of stem cells.  Most animals feel good after treatment.  Occasionally, they are a little stiff immediately after application, but it is usually short-lived and resolves with movement.”

— Chattanooga Mobile RPW 

What are the indications for using shockwave therapy? 

Studies have shown radial shockwave to be effective in treating:

  • Subacute or chronic soft tissue injuries (muscle strains, ligament sprains, injuries to tendons, etc.)
  • Osteoarthritis and injuries to joints
  • Lumbosacral disc disease
  • Stress fractures
  • And more!

Does my pet need to be sedated to receive treatment with shockwave therapy?

No!  We can perform the treatment during a regular appointment.  The therapy does produce a unique sound and sensation, but we will help to acclimatize your pet to the therapy to reduce any fear or nervousness on their part.  Many of our patients barely notice when the treatment is being performed.

Interested in learning more? 

Give us a call at 613-825-5001 for more information on shockwave therapy or to schedule consultation with one of our veterinarians.  We can help to determine if shockwave therapy is appropriate for your pet.  Alternatively, if your pet has been referred to our hospital for shockwave therapy by your regular veterinarian, please contact one of our client service representatives for details.

Tick Season Is Here!

By | Parasite

Over the past few years, we have been seeing an increase in tick bites and more positive Lyme disease tests, so it is important to know the facts.Ticks tend to live in tall grasses and forested areas.

Deer TickThere are 3 types of ticks that are more common in Ottawa and surrounding areas, and several tick borne diseases. The tick we are most concerned about is the deer tick (ixodes scapularis). They become active at temperatures of 4 Celsius and above, which means that with the warm weather the ticks are out early this year! Due to every month having at least one warm day where ticks could bite we are now recommending year round protection from ticks! One bite is all it takes.

They are attracted to the warmth and motion of mammals, and as a dog  (or human) walks by, ticks will climb on or drop onto their host, attach their mouthparts into the skin and start feeding. Once they have fed for several hours, they grow in size and can be much more easily noticed. Be sure to run your hands over your dog after they come in from outside and check for ticks very carefully – they are very small and can easily be missed!

Deer ticks are the only tick in the area which carry lyme disease. These ticks need to feed for about 24-48 hours before they can transmit the disease. Signs of lyme disease are usually mild and include fever, lameness, stiffness, swollen joints, and enlarged lymph nodes, but can become severe and cause severe kidney disease among other concerns.

In the event of a tick bite we monitor for signs of lyme disease and run a screening test called a SNAP 4Dx, which checks for the immune system’s response to lyme disease. This test cannot tell us whether a dog will become afflicted with the disease, just that there is exposure to the bacteria.

You can help protect your dog from ticks, and the diseases they carry, by using preventative medication. There are many different types of preventative medications so be sure to ask your vet which is right for you and your pet.

Animal Health + Human Health + Planet Health = One Health

By | Pet Health

As we become more interconnected globally, it is apparent that veterinarians, doctors and scientists need to work together to ensure the healthy future if animals, humans and the planet.

The recipe for success is:

Animal Health + Human Health + Planet Health = One Health

None of the three components in the above “recipe” work alone – just as in baking, one must mix the right high quality ingredients and use proper tools to make the recipe work well.  When all of these efforts mix well together, we can enjoy one health!

How are these interconnected?

Historically, about 75% of human infectious diseases originated in animals (thing plague or tuberculosis), and outbreaks of diseases like West Nile virus and Zika virus remind us that new diseases keep emerging.  Familiar diseases in Canada include rabies and certain pet and wildlife parasites that can be transmitted between people and animals (zoonoses) with or without vectors (pests that carry and spread diseases).

Both animals (big and small) and people need a healthy environment within which to thrive.  Taking care of our pets to keep diseases and parasites in check allows us to provide a barrier to risks like feces contamination of watercourses and groundwater that can spread to the wider animal community and people.

Protection of our precious environment is an exceptionally important mission in itself, but it is also important to maintain the living area of wildlife so they can find enough food an are not crowded out by development, are not subjected to harmful pollutants, or even undergo extinction.

We are all part of the web of life and need to manage our pets, livestock, living areas and the food supply for sustainability.

The take home message is that by protecting your animal’s health you also help provide for the health of the humans and protect the environment as well.  We need to work together to protect the animals we live with and the animal communities who share our planet environment.  This is a global effort!

(8.09.2016) Dr. Kathleen Cavanagh, Online Editor, CVMA


By | News

At the end of this month, Dr. Erica Gallagher will be leaving Cedarview Animal Hospital. Dr. Gallagher is starting a new chapter in her life as she and Dr. Ann McKenna start their own practice in Stittsville. Dr. McKenna is a familiar face also at Cedarview, having filled in while Dr. Kim Holzman was on maternity leave.

Dr. Gallagher has been with Cedarview for 4 years, taking time away to raise her twin children with her husband, John.

We want to extend our best wishes for Dr. Gallagher and Dr. McKenna’s careers and thank them both for their contributions to the care of our clients and their pets.

Dr. Nigel Gumley