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dogs

Echinococcus tapeworm emerging in Ontario – how to protect your dog and yourselves

By | Parasite, Pet Health

Since 2012, we have been receiving reports of dogs developing a serious disease caused by the tapeworm, Echinococcus multilocularis (E. mulit for short).  While tapeworms are not unusual in dogs and cats, most are more of a nuisance than a serious health concern.  E. multi is a new game in town.

microscope image of E. multi tapeworm

Microscope image of E. multi tapeworm

This tiny parasite (3 mm long as an adult) infects wild canids, particularly coyotes and foxes.  Microscopic tapeworm eggs are ingested by an intermediate host, typically small rodents, and dogs and cats become infected when they ingest these rodents.  In this situation, the dog or cat will develop the intestinal adult parasite in their gut and begin shedding tapeworm eggs also.

adult coyote standing in the snowUnlike common tapeworms, however, dogs and people can become accidental intermediate hosts for the disease by accidently ingesting the tapeworm eggs directly from contaminated from coyote or fox feces.  In this situation, the tapeworm can form cysts in the liver or lungs of the dog or person, a condition known as Alveolar Echinococcus, and this is what we have been seeing since 2012.  A dog may present with expanding and large cysts within its liver or lungs, gradually destroying the normal tissues.  In people, this condition can take 5 to 15 years, making diagnosis difficult.

A recent study of Ontario coyote populations demonstrated 23% of fecal samples were infected with the tapeworm, raising concerns for pet and human health.  Please read the article from Dr. Scott Weese of the University of Guelph for more information: https://www.wormsandgermsblog.com/2019/01/articles/animals/dogs/echinococcus-multilocularis-ontario-canada/ or at https://www.emultiontario.com/.

Prevention of Echinococcus can only be directed at the intestinal form of the disease by treating dogs regularly with Praziquantal, a safe and effective dewormer.  Dogs that may be at risk are those that may ingest rodents or wildlife poop.  Unfortunately, the Alveloar form of the disease that develops from eating coyote feces is more difficult to prevent.

boxes of Interceptor PlusWe now carry Interceptor Plus for prevention of tapeworms in dogs.  As you may be aware, monthly Interceptor pills are used for Heartworm, roundworm, hookworm and whipworm prevention during the summer and fall.  Interceptor Plus contains Praziquantal also and can be used to prevent Echinococcus infection.  Used for this purpose, it can be given monthly during anytime of the year that the dogs are considered at risk (may eat rodents or coyote/fox poop).

Please take the time to read the attached information on E. multi and speak to our staff if you have further questions or would like to use Interceptor Plus for your dog.

 

Dr. Nigel Gumley

Cedarview Animal Hospital

Now Offering Shockwave Therapy

By | Services

Cedarview Animal Hospital is excited to announce that we now offer shockwave therapy for our patients!

What is shockwave therapy?picture of a radial shockwave device

“Radial shockwave is a pressure wave system.  The applicator head contains a small metal bullet that gets rapidly forced against the applicator head, creating a pressure wave that transmits into the tissue that the applicator head is pressed against.  The end result is a stimulus that increases blood flow to the affected area which can help stimulate healing and pain relief, and causes the release of growth factors and the recruitment of stem cells.  Most animals feel good after treatment.  Occasionally, they are a little stiff immediately after application, but it is usually short-lived and resolves with movement.”

— Chattanooga Mobile RPW 

What are the indications for using shockwave therapy? 

Studies have shown radial shockwave to be effective in treating:

  • Subacute or chronic soft tissue injuries (muscle strains, ligament sprains, injuries to tendons, etc.)
  • Osteoarthritis and injuries to joints
  • Lumbosacral disc disease
  • Stress fractures
  • And more!

Does my pet need to be sedated to receive treatment with shockwave therapy?

No!  We can perform the treatment during a regular appointment.  The therapy does produce a unique sound and sensation, but we will help to acclimatize your pet to the therapy to reduce any fear or nervousness on their part.  Many of our patients barely notice when the treatment is being performed.

Interested in learning more? 

Give us a call at 613-825-5001 for more information on shockwave therapy or to schedule consultation with one of our veterinarians.  We can help to determine if shockwave therapy is appropriate for your pet.  Alternatively, if your pet has been referred to our hospital for shockwave therapy by your regular veterinarian, please contact one of our client service representatives for details.